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August 21.
, , Hawaii, off-grid, volcano 0 A lava flows emerging from the elongated fissure in Pahoa (USGS) Kīlauea EruptsOn May 3, 2018, quiet island life changed radically for those in the Puna District of the Big Island of Hawaii.
The 2018 lower Puna eruption on the island of Hawaii on Kīlauea volcano’s East Rift Zone began on May 3, 2018, then on May 4, a 6.9 magnitude earthquake hit Puna.
This eruption evolved into 24 fissures, forcing the evacuation of 2000 residents.
The Puna Geothermal Venture, which provided one-quarter of the island’s electricity, was forced to shut down and was later damaged by lava.
The fissures had sent lava rivers that buried part of Hawaii Route 137 on May 19, and began flowing into the ocean.
On May 29, lava from a new northeastern flow overran Hawaii Route 132, cutting the access between Kapoho and Pahoa.
After months of uncertainty and devastation, on December 5, 2018, the volcano eruption ended.
Roads, power and services were interrupted and needed to be re-established.
For many who had only vaguely considered solar or microgrids, this became a real concern for survival and sustainability in Hawaii’s fragile and volatile environment.
In this handout photo provided by the U.
S.
Geological Survey, lava from a fissure slowly rolls down the street on Saturday near Pahoa, Hawaii after the eruption of the Kilauea volcano Rebuilding with Sustainable Energy SupplyLongtime Pahoa resident Wendy contacted BoxPower in 2019.
Wendy’s situation was not unique: she had been looking for an off-grid solar + battery solution for her home on the Big Island of Hawaii for several years, but no one had been able to meet her exact requirements.
Wendy’s home is one of the many in the Pahoa region of Hawaii that lack access to electricity, due to a combination of their remote location and the intermittent flows of lava from the nearby Kīlauea Volcano, as well as tropical storms.
Wendy was using a generator for her primary source of power since building her home in the early 2000s, spending on average $300-500 per month on gasoline to power her home, and attached home-office.
(This gasoline is shipped to Hawaii, adding significant transportation costs and energy use.) Boxpower’s Plug and Play MicrogridBoxPower was able to offer the options needed to make a microgrid part of Wendy’s sustainable energy solution.
In July 2019, BoxPower Inc.
was contracted to design, build, and deploy a palletized solar + storage system to power Wendy’s off-grid home and home-office in Pahoa, Hawaii.
Boxpower designed a system to meet her needs and constructed it in California.
This was then shipped to the Big Island and installed on -site in a single day by Wendy herself, following Boxpower’s detailed instructions.
Boxpower’s system consisted of a 21kWh lithium ferro phosphate battery system, and 12kW AC-coupled battery inverter pre-wired inside of a 4’ x 8’ palletized metal enclosure, with a 3.5kW solar PV array mounted on top.
This system was designed to connect to a back-up gasoline generator, and to be expandable with an additional ground-mount or roof-top array, adding the flexibility that was needed to fully adapt this rural tropical environment.
As Wendy’s power needs grew, she chose to increase her capabilities at home and given the ease of adding to BoxPower’s system, Wendy added an additional 4kW ground-mount PV array, bringing the total system PV capacity to 7.5kW.
Energy Savings + Increased SecurityThis palletized solar + battery system now saves Wendy approximately $600/month in avoided fuel expenditures, and offsets 27,231 lbs of CO2 equivalent per year.
Calculated at 48 lbs of CO2 per tree absorption, this is the equivalent of planting 567 trees per year.
Additionally, her home is secure with power supplied throughout other climate change related weather incidents.
“I spent 2 years looking for a system that met my needs for a 10kW system to run manufacturing that was not on my roof, which would leave it vulnerable to hurricanes.  I also needed customer service and a warranty.
I looked all over Europe and Canada and had many other bids.
Every detail on system integration has been covered from specification to installation.
I couldn’t be happier with BoxPower.
It’s life changing.
I am super happy.
We are really proud as a company that we are a net zero company with zero waste.” —Wendy with the Wrist Widget, Big Island Hawaii Boxpower’s 21kWh lithium ferro phosphate battery system, and 12kW AC-coupled battery inverter pre-wired inside of a 4’ x 8’ palletized metal enclosure, with a 3.5kW solar PV array mounted on top—installed in a single day.
Also shown is Boxpower’s Minibox 4kW ground-mount PV array.
Together this produces total system PV capacity to 7.5kW.
About BoxPowerBoxPower is a leading provider of plug and play solar energy solutions worldwide, offering best-in-class engineering, components, and workmanship to meet the needs of residential, community, commercial, and agricultural applications.

BoxPower’s modular systems can be sized from as little as 3.5kW and as much as 528kW

From rural homes and farms in California to community microgrid projects in Alaska and disaster recovery in Puerto Rico, BoxPower offers clean, reliable, and affordable energy anywhere.
www.boxpower.io.
Contact Dalan Angelo at [email protected] for more information on Boxpower’s sustainable energy solutions.
August 7.
clean energy, solar, , solar energy, Energy anywhere, Backup power, Community Resilience, , California, , renewables, Mercy Corps 0 A case study from Mercy Corps’ Resilience Hub in Guayama, Puerto Rico Aim Mercy Corps and BoxPower seek to disseminate lessons learned from our Resilience Hub Program in Guayama, Puerto Rico to create a replicable model for energy resilience projects on which other non-profits can build.
Resilience Hubs – Background and Context In 2017, Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, causing unprecedented loss of lives and livelihoods whilst also exposing the fragility of the Puerto Rican electrical infrastructure.
During this crisis, more than eighty¹ percent of the grid’s transmission and distribution power lines collapsed , leaving 1.5 million customers ² without power.
This loss of infrastructure meant that communities had to find power generators to keep medicines cold, ventilators working, and other essential electrical equipment functioning.
It has been  documented³ that this prolonged lack of power for essential needs led to a further loss of lives.
This highlights the essential need for reliable electricity supply before, during and after such a crisis.
Following the hurricane, Mercy Corps initially provided directemergency response.
However, it soon became evident that asuccessful transition to long term recovery required a communityresilience approach.
Mercy Corps secured funding for our Resilience Hubs Program, which aimed to create 15 Resilience Hubs in the most vulnerable communities around the island to equip them with resources that would allow them to respond to future natural disasters.
These 15 Hubs serve to leverage existing community centers and provide a range of resiliency support mechanisms.
To date, 17 such centres have been established, providing a multitude of Mercy Corps sponsored assets for community use.
These include community gardens and agricultural resources; disaster risk reduction training and material; connectivity equipment; potable water storage systems; and off-grid photovoltaic energy with storage capacities – all of which directly benefit over 95,000 members of Puerto Rico’s most vulnerable communities.
Since implementation, the capabilities and resiliency of the Hubs have been both tested and validated.
In 2019, storm Dorian and Karen swept the island, followed shortly after by a 6.4 magnitude earthquake in January 2020.
The damage caused by the earthquake was largely considered one of the worst crises the island had faced since Hurricane Maria.
The Resilience Hubs played a crucial role in providing a centralized locale for storm preparation, coordination and community organization during all three disaster events.
Emergency response was centralized at the Hubs as critical access to ​water, energy, recharge stations, food and emergency supplies and internet connectivity were provided.
One Hub, equipped with a kitchen powered by solar energy, was used by World Central Kitchen to provide meals to surrounding communities and first responders, impacting at least 1,500 individuals during its first week of emergency response.
The Use of Solar for Resilience Hubs The use of solar + battery storage for Mercy Corps Resilience Hubs proved essential for providing reliable energy access throughout these crises.
Solar connected to battery storage allows for the use of energy generated from the system day or night, both in times of grid supplied electricity and during an outage.
Without the storage, a grid-tied solar energy system would not provide energy during an outage.
The promotion of renewable energy also aligns tightly with Mercy Corps community driven approach to problem solving, and the desire to mitigate the impact of climate change within the communities it serves.
Solar power generation was an obvious choice given the inherent vulnerabilities of Puerto Rico’s grid and the country’s UV potential.
Solar + storage enables communities to effectively plan due to the knowledge that they will have reliable electricity access.
The flexibility of solar + storage, particularly through a modular approach, means that the capacity of the existing system can be increased to meet emergency requirements: for cold storage, medicine preservation, or whatever disaster response may arise.
Lastly, solar + storage removes reliance on diesel for generators, which dramatically increases in cost or is completely unavailable during disasters.
For these reasons, access to clean and reliable energy to power the Resilience Hubs remained a requirement throughout the design phase.
The Mercy Corps Puerto Rico (PR) Infrastructure team assessed the needs of each community and site location to see if solar installation was an option.
This process identified that 14 of the 17 Hub locations could have high-capacity solar energy systems installed to better support the resilience of the communities they serve.
One such example is the Guayama Hub.
Guayama Hub The Guayama Hub was established in 2019 at the community school, Rafael A.
Delgado Mateo.
Through a competitive procurement process, BoxPower was identified as the solar installer, providing a dependable solar + storage system to support the local community in the face of emergencies.
Groundwork and foundation work began in late December in partnership with local contractors.
On January 3, 2020, the container had been placed on the foundation and connected to the school.
Soon after this, Puerto Rico schools, including Rafael A Delgado Mateo, were closed for weeks following a 6.4 magnitude earthquake.
Despite these challenges, BoxPower was able to get access to the site in order to rapidly install the solar array, and fully commission the BoxPower unit by January 13, within a week of the earthquake.
Highlights of the Project Mercy Corps PR team were happy with the number of communication channels between themselves, BoxPower and the subcontractor, and the speed at which the anchoring of the container, PV installations and commissioning moved once the foundation and permits were cleared.
The team felt that even when working across different time zones and accounting for staff leave, BoxPower were always quick to respond, which meant that if issues arose they were mitigated quickly relative to the complexity of the tasks.
Furthermore, the team were impressed with the expertise shared by BoxPower, “Eric Youngren did one of the best handover presentations to the Community Based Organisation (CBO) and the community that we’ve ever had, it was clear, knowledgeable and full of examples.
It was given in English but it did not seem to be a barrier since we had someone from our team translating it.” BoxPower was able to train local contractors and school employees on both the installation of the racking and also the operation of the system.
This also helped to increase local engagement, reduce costs, and allow for local operation of the system.
Given the remote monitoring capabilities installed, BoxPower can identify problems remotely should they arise and walk the local operator or a local technician through the issues.
The system was quickly put to the test on January 29, 2020 when the power went out just after 8:00am.
As can be seen on the graph below, the batteries seamlessly picked up the load.
According to school representatives, the only reason they knew the power was out was when local residents started to come to the Hub to use the power!Reliable power like this is essential for the local community.
As described by the School Director, “​for us it has been critically important to have a good solar energy system that can serve the community.
Especially for those of us that may one day need this space as a refuge [during a natural disaster].
With this system, we’ll be able to continue educating the children.
This solar system has been a blessing.​” BoxPower Centered around helping communities, governments, humanitarian and emergency relief agencies, BoxPower is a social enterprise providing access to power with containerized solar + storage solutions.
BoxPower’s products are designed to bring off-grid power rapidly and provide energy resilience when power supply from the grid is unavailable or unreliable.
Benefitting over 3,000 people to date, they have helped provide clean, affordable, reliable energy access to established and emerging markets around the world.
Their products are rapidly deployable, ship within days of ordering, and install on-site in a single day.
By pre-assembling and mass-producing their systems in shipping containers, they can control cost, lead time and logistics.

BoxPower has been working in the Caribbean since Hurricane Maria

providing resilience with its rugged systems.
Its systems, including that at the Guayama Resilience Hub, can withstand 188 mph winds.
This is crucial for providing reliable electricity supply for critical loads during natural disasters.
Furthermore, the standalone design allows the system to be installed next to the Hub, which enables solar provision without requiring ownership of the building.

This ​video chronicles BoxPower’s work in Guayama and the Caribbean

Conclusion Mercy Corps in partnership with BoxPower provided a model for energy resilience in the community of Guayama, Puerto Rico.
This system has continued to provide essential backup power for the community in the face of emergencies.
The outcomes of this project have been commended by both the local community and Mercy Corps and we believe that there is great potential for this model to provide a high quality solution for backup power across numerous Resilience Hubs.
As the Puerto Rican community and communities around the world prepare for the next disaster, Mercy Corps and BoxPower are confident that its Hubs will continue to support local disaster response efforts and provide a standardized and scalable model for comparable efforts globally.
CONTACTALFREDO PÉREZ​  [email protected] QUIÑONES [email protected] PEÑA.
[email protected] ANGELO [email protected] BoxPower BoxPower is a leading provider of plug and play solar energy solutions worldwide, offering best-in-class engineering, components, and workmanship to meet the needs of residential, community, commercial, and agricultural applications.
BoxPower’s modular systems can be sized from as little as 3.5kW and as much as 528kW.
From rural homes and farms in California to community microgrid projects in Alaska and disaster recovery in Puerto Rico, BoxPower offers clean, reliable, and affordable energy anywhere.
About Mercy Corps Mercy Corps is a leading global organization powered by the belief that a better world is possible.
In disaster, in hardship, in more than 40 countries around the world, we partner to put bold solutions into action — helping people triumph over adversity and build stronger communities from within.
Now, and for the future.
March 16.
0 Case Example: Light Manufacturing Company Replaces Generator with Solar Plus Battery Storage to Reduce Costs and Emissions In December 2019.

BoxPower deployed an off grid SolarContainer in Concord

CA that shows the strong economic, environmental, and logistical advantages for off grid commercial customers.
These benefits include: Significant annual cost savings from reduction in generator fuel.
Range of options for amount of renewable energy production, up to 100%, with ability to meet air quality standards.
Turnkey system that installs in under one day, shipped anywhere.
The example below illustrates the advantages of BoxPower systems for off-grid commercial applications, based on a client’s light manufacturing operation in Concord, CA that had been running on a diesel generator for 20 years, as they were not able to receive utility service to their facility.
BoxPower Process for Right-sizing Solar Plus Battery Systems for Optimum Benefit at Least Cost Cost savings begins with right-sizing the system, no more and no less than what is required to meet both renewable energy and cost-saving goals.
In order to recommend the optimal solar plus battery system and at the least cost, BoxPower offers its Energy Audit and System Integration (EASI) service.
This process takes a detailed survey of current and planned energy usage as well as the customer’s current diesel generator usage.
It then recommends a BoxPower system and the potential savings and financial analysis of the system.
For this customer in Concord, CA, BoxPower’s EASI software recommended a 15kW PV array and 42kWh battery bank to integrate with the existing 30kW generator.
This system was designed to reach 90% renewable energy utilization  with no generator usage as can be seen in the February 2020 data below.   Diesel Generator Costs In Concord, CA the average diesel price is $3.79 and projected to increase 4.5% per year through 2040 (EIA).
Assuming the customer continues to use 2,300 gallons of diesel a year costing $8,700, the lifetime cost of only the diesel fuel totals 272,375 dollars over the 20 year useful life period.
Assuming $250 of maintenance per year (GTI), this total cost increases to $275,375.
Please note this does not include diesel procurement or storage costs which can increase costs above $5 per gallon.  BoxPower Financial Benefits The total cost of the BoxPower 15kW/42kWh system was $94,813 including our 1 day installation process due to BoxPower’s patented easy-to-assemble design.
Lifetime savings compared to the diesel generator are $178,143 before any investment tax credit.
With the 26% investment tax credit, lifetime savings increase to $202,795 and an ROI in year 6.
This customer chose to purchase outright, but if mixed with BoxPower’s 15 year financing, the customer experiences day 1 savings.
Please see the figure below showing savings for the customer.
Environmental Benefits Each gallon of diesel emits 22 pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere (EIA).
Since installation at the end of 2019, the Concord system has offset 11,509 pounds of carbon dioxide and will offset 1.1 million pounds of carbon dioxide over its life.
For commercial and government entities who must meet air quality standards, the BoxPower solar plus battery systems provide an immediate solution.
For those who wish to reduce generator use and emissions over time, all BoxPower systems are modular and easily scalable, enabling clients to add more solar and battery storage as their budgets allow, working toward renewable energy targets in an efficient and feasible way.
Logistics Benefits Instead of worrying about diesel procurement, generator maintenance, or complicated custom solar and battery systems, BoxPower removes the headache and trouble by providing a turnkey, plug-and-play system that works on arrival, and that requires zero maintenance.
Batteries and inverters are pre-wired inside a cargo container.
BoxPower assembles pre-cut racking and the solar panels on site, and then commissions the system, all in a single day.
Remote monitoring enables clients and BoxPower to assess system performance.  BoxPower, Clean, Affordable, and Reliable Energy Anywhere As seen by an off-grid commercial customer in California, there are significant value propositions in cost, simplicity, reliability, and sustainability for choosing BoxPower.
Please reach out to [email protected] or visit our website https://boxpower.io to learn more.  March 4.
0 Whether motivated by values or the need to save money on generator fuel and utility bills, small and large commercial farms alike are increasingly being driven to renewable energy to power their greenhouses and agricultural buildings.
“Even the small farms with just a few greenhouses are spending tens of thousands a year on electricity, whether via the grid or generator fuel,” says Tracy Huston, BoxPower’s Director of Partnerships who works with farmers to help them find cost-saving alternatives.
“As the cost of solar panels and batteries has come down, renewable energy is now a way to cut farm operating costs by using the clean energy of the sun.” Now that some counties in California are mandating reduction if not the elimination of generator use for agriculture, many are looking for an affordable alternative.
And with many states moving toward carbon taxes, many won’t be able to sustain energy-intensive farming practices without offsetting consumption with renewables.
Whether motivated by values or the need to save money on generator fuel and utility bills, small and large commercial farms alike are increasingly being driven to renewable energy to power their greenhouses and agricultural buildings.
“Even the small farms with just a few greenhouses are spending tens of thousands a year on electricity, whether via the grid or generator fuel,” says Tracy Huston, BoxPower’s Director of Partnerships who works with farmers to help them find cost-saving alternatives.
“As the cost of solar panels and batteries has come down, renewable energy is now a way to cut farm operating costs by using the clean energy of the sun.” Now that some counties in California are mandating reduction if not elimination of generator use for agriculture, many are looking for an affordable alternative.
And with the likely move toward carbon taxes, many won’t be able to sustain energy-intensive farming practices without offsetting consumption with renewables.
BoxPower’s affordable solutions for agriculture offer turnkey solar plus battery systems that can be added to over time, allowing farmers to gain energy independence and reduce their energy costs as budgets allow.
Founder and CEO Angelo Campus explains, “Our systems are modular, so you can start with a small solar array and a few batteries, then add more to meet your goals and as your resources and needs change.” BoxPower’s smallest system, the MiniBox, comes with a 9-panel 3.5kW solar array and 15.2kWh of lithium iron batteries, and can be scaled by adding additional rooftop or ground mount solar.
The larger Solar Containers come pre-wired with inverters and batteries inside a 20’ cargo container, with arrays that range from 6kW to 22kW.
Containers can be daisy-chained together to meet any load for the larger farm operations.
Any of the systems can be off-grid or grid-tied.
In counties requiring reduction of generator use, BoxPower’s “hybrid” solutions enable integration with a generator that recharges the batteries as needed, reducing fuel consumption and emissions.
The modular nature of the system allows farmers to add more batteries over time to continue reducing generator use and move toward 100% renewable energy.
Grid-tied farms can use the batteries for peak shaving to further reduce utility costs, as well as for emergency back-up power when the grid goes down—which, in California tends to happen at the worst times, during harvest season.
“One of our clients has been spending over $60,000 a year in generator fuel and maintenance alone, for a relatively small 10,000sf greenhouse operation.
With our solar plus battery solution, we are getting her to 50% renewable now, with a scalable plan for 100% in future.
The payback period for 50% renewable is about three years—it’s a no-brainer from a financial perspective,” says Huston.
For farms under pressure due to county air quality requirements, BoxPower offers a fast solution, with the plug-and-play, permit-ready systems able to be installed in under one day.
“Each system is custom-designed, using pre-engineered components,” explains Campus.
“We pre-wire the batteries and inverters in our shop in Grass Valley, pre-cut the racking system, and then ship just about anywhere.
It saves months of time and thousands on typical solar installation costs.” As an added benefit, the solar containers provide clean, usable space for storage or processing, complete with outlets and work lights.
“For those who need more work space on their farms, the solar containers provide pristinely finished interiors, with sealed flooring and options for placement of outlets and work lights.
So, you get clean energy and a farm building all-in-one, and at much less cost than buying a shed or constructing a stick-frame building.
It’s hard to make a living as a farmer.
We aim to take as much cost out of the system as we can, and leave more money in farmers’ pockets!” For more information about BoxPower solar plus battery solutions, see www.boxpower.io or email [email protected]
Whether motivated by values or the need to save money on generator fuel and utility bills, small and large commercial farms alike are increasingly being driven to renewable energy to power their greenhouses and agricultural buildings.
“Even the small farms with just a few greenhouses are spending tens of thousands a year on electricity, whether via the grid or generator fuel,” says Tracy Huston, BoxPower’s Director of Partnerships who works with farmers to help them find cost-saving alternatives.
“As the cost of solar panels and batteries has come down, renewable energy is now a way to cut farm operating costs by using the clean energy of the sun.” Now that some counties in California are mandating reduction if not the elimination of generator use for agriculture, many are looking for an affordable alternative.
And with many states moving toward carbon taxes, many won’t be able to sustain energy-intensive farming practices without offsetting consumption with renewables.
“One of our clients has been spending over $60,000 a year in generator fuel and maintenance alone, for a relatively small 10,000 sf greenhouse operation.
With our solar plus battery solution, we are getting her to 50% renewable now, with a scalable plan for 100% in the future.
The payback period for 50% renewable is about three years—it’s a no-brainer from a financial perspective,” says Huston.
At another farm, grid-tied with an indoor nursery, BoxPower is reducing utility bills by 80%, using the solar to power operations during the day, and the batteries to provide even more energy during their peak rate times and when consumption is highest.
BoxPower’s affordable solutions for agriculture offer turnkey solar plus battery systems that can be added to over time, allowing farmers to gain energy independence and continually reduce their energy costs, as budgets allow.
Founder and CEO Angelo Campus explains, “Our systems are modular, so you can start with a small solar array and a few batteries, then add more to meet your goals and as your resources and needs change.” BoxPower’s smallest system, the MiniBox, comes with a 9-panel 3.5kW solar array and 15.2kWh of lithium iron batteries, and can be scaled by adding additional rooftop or ground mount solar.
The larger Solar Containers come pre-wired with inverters and batteries inside a 20’ cargo container, with arrays that range from 6kW to 22kW (up to 60 panels).
Containers can be daisy-chained together to meet any load for the larger farm operations.
Any of the systems can be off-grid or grid-tied.
In counties requiring reduction of generator use, BoxPower’s “hybrid” solutions enable integration with a generator that recharges the batteries as needed, reducing fuel consumption and emissions.
The modular nature of the system allows farmers to add more batteries over time to continue reducing generator use and move toward 100% renewable energy.
Grid-tied farms can use the batteries for peak shaving to further reduce utility costs, as well as for emergency back-up power when the grid goes down—which, in California tends to happen at the worst times, during harvest season.
For farms under pressure due to county air quality requirements, BoxPower offers a fast solution, with the plug-and-play, permit-ready systems able to be installed in a single day.
“Each system is custom-configured, using pre-engineered components,” explains Campus.
“We pre-wire the batteries and inverters in our shop in Grass Valley, pre-cut the racking system, and then ship just about anywhere.
It saves months of time and thousands on typical solar installation costs.” As an added benefit, the solar containers provide clean, usable space for storage or processing, complete with outlets and work lights.
“For those who need more workspace on their farms, the solar containers provide pristinely finished interiors, with sealed flooring and options for placement of outlets and work lights.
So, you get clean energy and a farm building all-in-one, and at much less cost than buying a shed or constructing a stick-frame building.
It’s hard to make a living as a farmer.
We aim to take as much cost out of the system as we can, and leave more money in farmers’ pockets!” For more information about BoxPower solar plus battery solutions, see www.boxpower.io or email [email protected]
alaska, , Utility 0 Alaska Case Study.

Utility and community scale customers are among BoxPower’s strongest applications

By using BoxPower products, utility customers in Alaska have reduced project costs by up to 50%.  A Cost-Effective Solution.
BoxPower’s most concentrated utility customers have been in Alaska with customers including NANA Regional Corporation, Buckland Municipal District, and Deering Municipal District.
In two communities already with a third on the way, Alaska is one of the oldest microgrid markets in the world given the remote nature for many of its communities.
Historically, diesel-based, these microgrids face -50 degree F temperatures, harsh winds, and require fuel to be flown or barged in.
Facing high and increasing diesel prices, BoxPower multi-box microgrids have become a cost-effective solution due to its turnkey design.
BoxPower has streamlined the design, procurement, and installation process for solar microgrids in one of the most challenging regions in the world.
BoxPower customer Brian Hirsch, of Deerstone Consulting Reliable Power Anywhere.
When delivering power to more than 1,200 residents in some of the most remote places in the world, reliability is essential in our system design.
With built-in redundancies and proven execution, BoxPower is proud to ensure lights, refrigerators, ovens, and warm water stays on.  Paying more than seven dollars per gallon, customers have been won in competitive bidding processes and by articulating quick 3-5 year return on investments.
Additionally, Sonny Adams from one project sponsor NANA articulates, “This solution will provide dependable power that is also clean, important to protecting the subsistence foods we rely on.” BoxPower is excited to apply its standardized and streamlined design to reduce design, installation, and logistics costs on your next utility or community project.  Rapidly Deployable Microgrids for Emergency Response in Puerto Rico.
, Hurricane relief, , Emergency Response 0 Puerto Rico Case Study.
When disaster strikes and leaves entire communities in the dark without power, BoxPower is at the front-lines, partnering with nonprofits and governmental agencies to provide reliable energy for emergency response services.  Hurricane Maria.
After Hurricane Maria in 2017, BoxPower served as a first responder, delivering a rapidly deployable microgrid to a remote mountainous community where grid electricity was not reinstated for more than 8 months.
Through their partnership with Mutual Aid Disaster Relief, Arecma, and Footprint Org – BoxPower was able to provide power to a community resilience center, health clinic and soup kitchen that provided critical shelter, food, and water to more than 300 residents.  January 2020 Earthquakes.
In January of 2020, Puerto Rico experienced over 1280 earthquakes that caused over $110M in damage – toppling over 500 homes – and plunging the entire island into intermittent darkness due to severe damage to one of Puerto Rico’s primary power plants, which could take more than a year to repair.  In the wake of these earthquakes, BoxPower returned to install energy providing products to a school resilience center and medical clinic.
They arranged the delivery of two containerized microgrid systems to the region within days, and soon, their and MiniBox began providing a reliable and uninterrupted supply of clean energy to the impacted community.
In the southern town of Guayama.

BoxPower partnered with Mercy Corps

to install a 24kW SolarContainer at a school resilience center, which will serve as a gathering place for community members during outages or disasters – providing a place for them to charge phones, computers, and medical devices and to organize disaster response efforts.
The system, which consists of a solar array mounted to a shipping container with pre-wired batteries and inverters inside, can power an average-sized medical clinic, school, or other critical facilities during extended outages.  Closer to the earthquake epicenter.

BoxPower partnered with Direct Relief to deliver one of their MiniBox trailers

a scaled down, fully mobile version of their SolarContainers capable of being towed behind a standard car or truck.
This unit will be used to provide power to a medical clinic impacted by the earthquake, to ensure that medications and vaccines can remain refrigerated and usable in the event of ongoing power outages.  BoxPower continues to work with governmental and non-profit agencies worldwide, providing advanced energy technologies, resilience consulting, and project management services in preparation for future natural disasters – ensuring that the people, and those responsible for them – have access to clean, affordable, and reliable energy  – anywhere.
California: A Model of Energy Resilience for Critical Facilities.
Public Safety Power Shutoff, , , California, 0 California Case Study.
A need for emergency backup power has now been highlighted by the energy crisis in BoxPower’s home state of California.
Destructive wildfires combined with rolling power shut offs have made relying on the grid a risky endeavor.
Millions of Californians went without power in October and November of 2019, with many more ‘Public Safety Power Shut Offs’ planned for the future.
BoxPower’s office faced over 150 hours of outage but was able to stay open and productive thanks to one of its systems.
This is just one example of how BoxPower microgrids offer a solution to this unique challenge facing California’s future.  A New Era of Wildfires.
In 2018, BoxPower spearheaded wildfire resilience and recovery efforts in Northern California wildfires, aiding in the recovery from fires.

BoxPower provided solar equipment to residents impacted by the Paradise Fire

consulting to county agencies regarding their critical facility resilience plans, and supporting non-profits in procuring microgrid systems for medical clinics and community centers.
Public Safety Power Shut Offs in California.
In 2019, the risk of wildfires caused by transmission lines forced the investor owned utility, PG&E to enact the ‘Public Safety Power Shut Off.’ As blackouts extended for days, and gas stations were unable to pump fuel, Californians felt firsthand the significant impact of unreliable power.  BoxPower stepped in and began serving California governmental and NGO clients to plan, procure, and execute microgrid resilience projects at critical facilities impacted by the wildfire prevention ‘Public Safety Power Shut Offs.’ Nevada County, BoxPower’s home county, is now one of multiple counties working with BoxPower to identify sites and critical loads, .

As they implement BoxPower for its 2020 resilience plan.  Energy Resilience

Energy insecurity is driving interest in distributed energy alternatives, especially solar + storage microgrid systems, that can deliver reliable, 24-hour power.
BoxPower has been on the leading edge of this seeing increased demand for its modular microgrid system from customers throughout California.  BoxPower continues to work with governmental and non-profit agencies in California and around the world, providing advanced energy technologies, resilience consulting, and project management services in preparation for future natural disasters – ensuring that the people, and those responsible for them – have access to clean, affordable, and reliable energy  – anywhere.
Community Resilience in Mariana.
, Community Resilience, Hurricane relief, 0 Mariana Case Study.
When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2018, entire communities found themselves in the dark without power.
3 million people in schools, hospitals, and businesses were left wondering if and when the grid would be restored.
Designed in a Princeton Research Lab after the 2010 Haiti earthquake for this very purpose, .

BoxPower rapidly deployed a solar microgrid system to the rural community of Mariana

Rapid Deployment.
The rural community of Mariana experienced some of the worst impacts from Hurricane Maria and was told grid electricity would not return for more than 9 months.
BoxPower was able to deploy its system rapidly and ensure power returned much more quickly.
This is thanks to its simple, modular, and intuitive design that can be installed just like an ikea set.
Community Resilience.
Not only would power be out for up to nine months after Hurricane Maria, but Mariana was a community that experienced frequent outages in normal times averaging more than 100 outage hours per year.  Thanks to a community resilience initiative, power was available to its laundromat, coworking space, and health clinic after hurricane Maria and into the future.
Instead of a short term solution like a diesel generator, the community turned towards a long term, community-based solution built on a foundation of clean, reliable power provided by BoxPower’s solar microgrids.
This unit, our first, continues to power the community center through the 2019 hurricane season and the January 2020 earthquakes ensuring clean, reliable, affordable power 24/7.
January 17 California Microgrid Company BoxPower Inc.
delivers two rapidly deployable microgrid systems to earthquake stricken region of Puerto Rico.
0 San Juan, Puerto Rico &  Grass Valley, California: Once again, Puerto Rico has been stricken by a natural disaster, this time a series of of over 1280 earthquakes , that have caused over $110M in damage -toppling over 500 homes – and plunging the entire island into intermittent darkness due to severe damage to one of Puerto Rico’s primary power plants , which could take more than a year to repair.
BoxPower Inc., a California start-up company providing rapidly deployable renewable microgrids in shipping containers, got their start in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, when they deployed one of their Modular Solar Microgrids at a community center providing food and shelter to those impacted by the hurricane.
Now, almost two years later, BoxPower has returned to Puerto Rico in the wake of the earthquake to deploy two more microgrids: at a school resilience center and medical clinic in the south of the island, both of which have been impacted by the recent earthquakes.
In the southern town of Guayama.

BoxPower has partnered with Mercy Corps

to install a 24kW SolarContainer at a school resilience center, which will serve as a gathering place for community members during outages or disasters – providing a place for them to charge phones, computers, and medical devices and to organize disaster response efforts.
The system, which consists of a solar array mounted to a shipping container with pre-wired batteries and inverters inside, can power an average-sized medical clinic, school, or other critical facility during extended outages.
BoxPower’s technicians arrived on Monday, January 13th, and the system is scheduled for final commissioning on Friday, January 17th.  (pictures below) Closer to the earthquake epicenter.

BoxPower has partnered with Direct Relief to deliver one of their MiniBox trailers

a scaled down, fully mobile version of their SolarContainers capable of being towed behind a standard car or truck.
This unit will be used to provide power to a medical clinic impacted by the earthquake, to ensure that medications and vaccines can remain refrigerated and usable in the event of ongoing power outages.
(Pictures on page 3).
October 7 2019 Fire Weather and the Need for Emergency Back-Up Power: The Hidden Dangers of Utility Shut-Offs for Rural Communities.
PG&E, Power Shutoff, PSPS, Public Safety Power Shutoff, , Energy anywhere, Backup power 0 Fire Weather and the Need for Emergency Back-Up Power: The Hidden Dangers of Utility Shut-Offs for Rural Communities It’s fire season, once again.
Reeling from the loss of life and estimated $16.5 billion in damage from the Camp Fire, a direct result of an aging and ill-maintained utility infrastructure, this year PG&E began the season by shutting off the power to some 21,000 residents in three counties, and the very next day again to over 48,000 in the foothills areas.
It was a preventative measure in response to the forecast red flag warning.
While the school kids were complaining about loss of TV and Xbox for the second day of the forewarned 24 to 48 hour shutdown, most the grown-ups I know in my rural county were relieved.
According to CalFire, roughly 10% of fires between 2013 and 2017 were caused by utility infrastructure, including some of the State’s largest and most deadly.
My own neighborhood was evacuated in the 2017 Lobo fire, which had been caused by a downed power line.
We were spared; but seeing the night sky light up with flames a mile from our home is not something I will ever forget.
So I was glad to be in one of the areas PG&E had designated for the county’s first 2019 fire season power shut downs—that is, until I realized how vulnerable we were without power during a red flag warning, and why safe and reliable emergency back-up systems are essential.  I had enrolled in the PG&E alerts system, and received text messages warning of the shut-off well in advance.
I gassed up my truck, froze blocks of ice to keep in the fridge so the food wouldn’t spoil, charged my cell phone, and gathered the usual assortment of candles and solar lanterns.
With the weather still temperate and no need of heating or cooling the house, it seemed at first like it was no big deal.
In fact, it was kind of fun.
We ran around playing flashlight tag with my granddaughter, and enjoyed sitting out under the stars, more visible than usual for all the darkness of a blackout.
But around 10:00pm when the wind picked up, the safety implications of rural life without electricity hit me.
We have a well for our water, and despite a whole-house fire sprinkler system, a 2500 gallon water storage tank, and a couple of water lines connected to fire hose hook-ups, the well and water tank pumps don’t work when the power is out.
So there was no way for the fire suppression equipment to be used.
Duh.
But it was not something I had considered when building my rural home years ago, long before the “new normal” of Public Safety Power Shutoffs.
As I sat in the dark and listened to the hum of neighbors’ generators kicking on, I grew more anxious.
Portable emergency generators typically require the use of extension cords to plug in various appliances.
Great.
So now we have no water, and a bunch of gas and diesel engines sitting out in the parched woods with extension cords running all over the dry grass.
And when I went to check for weather and power updates on my cell phone, having made sure to charge it fully before the 5:00 shut-off, I found my cell service was also down.
I suddenly realized I not only had no cellular, but no wifi, with the modem requiring, of course, electricity.
If a fire broke out at my place, I had no way to contact help.
To make matters worse, despite all the enrolling in emergency alert systems months before, no one could call us to alert us of a need to evacuate.
So I sat in the lantern light redesigning my home compound energy system to include back-up power, sufficient to at least assure supply of water and two-way connectivity to the outside world.
I have been designing affordable, sustainable homes for folks in my area for a few years now, including ways to optimize the rural on-site systems most of us rely on: wells, wastewater (septic systems), and power generation.
Despite tons of research, finding a safe and reliable solution for emergency back-up power is tricky.
While portable gas and diesel generators are the norm, they pose many limitations and many risks.
You can’t power a whole house off the types of generators you get at the local hardware store.
What’s more, most folks don’t have essential systems like well pumps and septic systems wired with a plug-in option anyway.
And, when the generator’s diesel or gas runs out, you are left once again with no power—yes, that’s right, the gas station pumps don’t work without electricity either.
So the portable generator option doesn’t really solve the problem: at best, you end up running extension cords to charge your phone and laptop, and maybe the fridge or necessary medical equipment.
Furthermore, extension cords pose a risk in themselves, with nearly 5000 house fires caused by them every year–firing up a portable generator during a red flag warning doesn’t make a whole lot of safety sense.
So I have spent a lot of time researching safer and more reliable alternatives.  I looked at whole-house generator options that are hardwired and presumably safer than the small portable ones.
But those are super expensive, ranging from a few thousand to over $10,000 for the generator, plus the cost of propane installation and fuel (propane being the only option for rural folk without access to utility natural gas).
I then researched solar options, figuring if I am going to spend the money, I might as well go with a renewable energy solution— lower my electric bills with solar while at the same time having emergency back-up power when I need it.  Typical grid-tied solar systems don’t solve the problem, either: when the grid goes down, you still lose the power those panels are generating–unless you have a way to store the energy in batteries.
Off-grid systems that have battery storage for back-up are notoriously expensive, given the high cost of batteries.
Few solar companies offer back-up systems for grid-tied consumers like me.
But, as it happened, a few weeks before the power shut-off I had discovered a local solar company, BoxPower , who has engineered hybrid solar plus back-up systems that are affordable, safe, and reliable .  Based in Grass Valley, BoxPower offers a turnkey solar plus emergency back-up system, pre-wired, permit-ready, that can be installed in a few hours – not the months a typical solar project requires.
The systems can be grid-tied, or off-grid.
The “hybrid” design incorporates batteries as storage to assure power at nighttime and even when the grid goes down, with options for a pre-wired (safe) generator for extra back-up energy when needed—minimum of 3 days of power guaranteed, rain or shine.
BoxPower has systems as small as 3.5kW and up to 528kW, with options for adding on over time and for connecting to rooftop mounted panels as well.
As the average home needs about 6kW to 9kW for 100% renewable energy, with a BoxPower hybrid system you can have ample emergency back-up power for the whole house in addition to well and septic systems, AND lower the cost of those high utility bills at the same time.
And, the BoxPower systems are actually affordable – only slightly more than the bids I got for a grid-tied rooftop solar system on my house that did not even include batteries for storage and generator back-up.
The BoxPower innovation is the use of a steel “box”, either a 4’ x 8’ pallet “MiniBox” or 20’ shipping container, on which the solar panels are mounted using a pre-engineered racking system.
The solar inverter plus batteries and a back-up generator are pre-wired inside the box, which is not only fire-safe but eliminates the cost of building a weather-proof shed for storing solar or generator equipment.
The MiniBox supports 3.5kW of solar panels, with inverter capacity up to 18kW for connecting to additional rooftop or ground-mount panels.
Larger 6kW to 22 kW systems are mounted on a 20’ shipping container, so you also get the bonus of usable storage for things like lawn and garden equipment, with a nicely finished interior pre-wired with outlets that far surpasses the quality and longevity of a shed, and without the cost of building one.
The whole system can be towed or trucked anywhere, plopped onto the ground and mounted without the need of an expensive foundation, and easily connected, whether to the grid or off-grid.
Ingenious.
I fell in love with the system because of the ease of it.
With the 3.5kW MiniBox, for under $20k I can get a plug-and-play solution that will give me ample emergency back-up power for my well and water pumps, as well as all the other critical loads in the house – wifi and outlets for charging cell phones and laptops, lights, even hot water and the fridge.
The rest of the year, the system will provide much of my total energy.
Because all BoxPower systems are modular, I can add a few more panels on my roof, easily connected to the MiniBox inverter, and be “net zero” – as well as free of the high costs of electric charged by my utility!  As for living under the new normal of Public Safety Power Shutoffs, as my 4 year-old granddaughter told me: “Don’t worry, the sun still works!” N.
B.
Shortly after discovering BoxPower, I went to work for them.
I wasn’t looking for a job.
A friend told me about them, given my passion for making sustainable living affordable for all people (even us moderate income folks), and my own quest for finding least-cost solar solutions.
So, I checked them out.
A week later, I accepted a job offer, because I believe that the BoxPower systems have cracked the nut in making solar both easy and affordable, better than most.
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